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Mon, 08/28/2017 - 2:15pm


The governor has named OEWI executive director Jennifer Monies as one of her four appointees to the Task Force on Improving the State Aid Formula. The task force will examine the forumla structure and make recommendations on ways to optimize efficiency. 

Fri, 04/28/2017 - 3:45pm


Oklahoma City (April 28, 2017) – Today Gov. Mary Fallin signed House Bill 1693 into law, which reforms Oklahoma’s A-F school accountability system. Jennifer Monies, Executive Director of the Oklahoma Educated Workforce Initiative, served on the State Department of Education’s Oklahoma Assessment and Accountability Task Force that studied and considered changes to both the state assessments and accountability system last fall.

Thu, 10/27/2016 - 4:13pm


Oklahoma City (October 28, 2016)
 – Jennifer Monies, Executive Director of the Oklahoma Educated Workforce Initiative, released the following comment on today’s State Department of Education release of the A-F state report cards:

Tue, 04/12/2016 - 9:41am

Oklahoma City (April 12, 2016) – Governor Fallin on Monday signed House Bill 3102 into law, expanding the number of classroom hours allowed for an adjunct teacher. These teachers are experts in a particular field who are willing to share their knowledge with students but have not gone through the teaching certification process. Previously they were limited to just 90 hours per semester, but HB 3102 expands that to 270 hours.

Wed, 10/28/2015 - 3:03pm

NAEP results show long road ahead

Oklahoma City (October 28, 2015) – Today’s release of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scores is a reminder that Oklahoma needs to step up its reform efforts in order to ensure our students aren’t at a competitive disadvantage. The results show improvement in 4th grade reading (30% of students proficient in 2013 to 33% in 2015) and 4th grade math (36% proficient in 2013 to 37% in 2015), no improvement in 8th grade math proficiency (29% both years) and a slight decrease in 8th grade reading proficiency (25% in 2013 to 23% in 2015).

“The one bright spot in the scores is the reading improvement in 4th graders, thanks to the Reading Sufficiency Act lawmakers passed in 2012,” said Oklahoma Educated Workforce Initiative Executive Director Jennifer Monies. “It shows that when proven reforms are in place, students will respond. But it also shows that more reforms are needed and that the state needs to commit itself to these improvements. The fact that 77 percent of Oklahoma 8th graders are not proficient in math is unacceptable and must be addressed immediately to ensure our students have a shot at their dream job.”

The scores also show the need for testing reform as the percentage of students scoring proficient in NAEP is significantly lower than the test scores administered by the state. According to state testing, 70% of 4th graders are proficient in reading and 72% in math while for 8th graders, it’s 75% proficient in reading and 53% proficient in math.

“As I mentioned earlier this year, the NAEP scores show the problem with not having state tests aligned to college and career readiness,” said Monies. “Our parents think their children are succeeding, but when they are compared to their peers across the country, they come up short.”

Mon, 09/21/2015 - 1:56pm

By Jennifer Monies, published August 28, 2015 at NewsOK.com

Jennifer Monies photoI think we can all agree that good teachers are not paid enough for the tremendous work they do. Research shows that a good teacher is the single most important school-related factor associated with student success, but a teacher shortage in Oklahoma prevents our schools from having a good teacher in front of every student.

Mon, 09/21/2015 - 1:55pm

Tulsa World August 22, 2015

I think we can all agree that good teachers are not paid enough for the tremendous work they do. Research shows that a good teacher is the single most important school-related factor associated with student success, but a teacher shortage in Oklahoma prevents our schools from having a good teacher in front of every student.

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 12:55pm

NewsOK.com July 1, 2015

Jennifer Monies PhotoI didn’t grow up in Oklahoma City. I don’t have memories of a desolate downtown after business hours or neighborhood whispers about brothels that apparently once existed walking distance from my house in the Gatewood Historic District. I only know an Oklahoma City with an NBA franchise, a bustling downtown park and a diverse local restaurant scene. Oklahoma City rivals any place I would want to raise my family. Almost nowhere else in the nation could I live within the urban core for the price and space we have. I live, work and play largely within a 5-mile radius.

But everything Oklahoma City has going for it is at risk. There is one more critical piece to Oklahoma City’s renaissance and our continued success and growth depends on it — improving its public schools.

Thu, 06/18/2015 - 11:33am

Recommends simpler formula tying funding to the student for a fairer system

Oklahoma City (June 18, 2015) – As lawmakers fashion a state budget that will include around $2-billion for common education, a new report commissioned by the Oklahoma Educated Workforce Initiative (OEWI) suggests changes to the funding formula used to distribute those funds. Titled “Understanding Oklahoma’s School Funding Formula and Student-Centric Alternatives,” the report is an in-depth look at the complex calculation created more than 30-years ago which determines how much money each district receives.

“Oklahoma businesses are a large source of tax revenue, so it’s critical that business leaders are educated on how that money is distributed to our state’s school districts,” said OEWI Executive Director Jennifer Monies. “We hope that Oklahoma will join several other states which are modernizing their school funding formulas to become more student-centric, transparent and traceable.”

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